23 July 2014

Idling Your Engine: It isn't good after all

Recently, my boyfriend and I were discussing whether idling your car engine these days was good for the environment or if it was better to simply restart the engine. Whilst we have been traveling throughout South America, we've both noticed that A LOT of drivers leave their vehicles running whilst stationary. Sometimes the engines of car and buses are left idling for up to thirty minutes!

To dispel the myth of the idling engine, here is an infographic shared on Upworthy, which sums it all up perfectly! Simply click the image below.

To learn more and to pass the word onto your friends, head over to It's Your Turn - Turn It Off.

Upworthy

21 July 2014

In a Sea of Garbage

Slate

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the average American produces 2kg of garbage per day. That's 13 kg per week and 726 kg of waste per year. But could you ever imagine laying in your very own waste?

Well, that's exactly what photographer, Gregg Segal asked his friends, neighbours and some relative strangers to do! In his project, '7 Days of Garbage', Segal aimed to include a range of people from different socioeconomic backgrounds and  asked to compile their garbage for a week.

25 June 2014

Is Your Facial Scrub Bad For The Environment?

Science Alert
The only thoughts that I had previously put into my facial scrub was to make sure that I applied it on my face in circular motions, before gently rinsing it off of my face. This, as we're told, is good for exfoliating the skin and removing those pesky dead skin cells, leaving you feeling 'refreshed and new'. 

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the environment, which comes off a little worse for wear. Why is this?

17 June 2014

Plastic Bottled Buildings

Visual News

In 2011, a two bedroom home using recycled plastic bottles from the streets was constructed in Nigeria. With a housing shortage in Nigeria, the creators showed that they were definitely onto something with their brilliant idea. 

The capped plastic bottles were packed with sand, a technique which was started in India, Central and South America about 12 years ago in a process named 'Bottle Brick'. Not only does the construction allow the building to maintain a year round temperature of around 18 degrees Celsius, it is bulletproof, earthquake resistant and fireproof.
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