16 April 2014

HOME



If you haven't seen the documentary 'HOME' yet, leave this page and watch it now!

Home, was released in 2009 and is composed entirely of beautifully filmed aerial shots of our world. Filmed by Yann Arthus-Berthard, the documentary looks at our Earth and explores the way humans have interrupted the natural balance in the last 200,000 years and how we are continuing to do so.

It took Yann Arthus-Berthard and his film crew almost three years to shoot Home, which was filmed in 120 different locations over 50 countries across the globe. Home calls us to make a stand and to change our unsustainable ways of living by exploring our current devastating effects on the globe.

09 April 2014

From Rubbish to Art, "Art is Trash"



Sadly, while I have been traveling around South America, I have seen A LOT of rubbish in the streets. From small towns with tiny populations who are positioned by beautiful lakes to amazing big cities with millions. Frankly, it has been upsetting me every time I see all the rubbish piled up on the side of the streets, in the parks, in gutters ... everywhere. It's safe to say that I have had a lot of rubbish on my mind.

However, Francisco de Pajaro is one man who has been turning unsightly rubbish into art. But why rubbish? In an interview with Societe Perrier, Francisco expressed that "It's a portrayal of the monstrous side of humanity. I think that trash is a true place to express yourself".

02 April 2014

Japanese Whaling Banned in the Southern Ocean



Have you heard the amazing news? The International Court of Justice has ruled that Japan must immediately halt all whaling programs in Antarctica, which were not held for scientific purposes.

Although, the ruling does not prevent Japan from hunting whales in the name of science, the court did find that their government subsidised whaling programs in the Southern Ocean were not for scientific purposes, as claimed. The court also stated that the number of whales, which have been killed was not justifiable under such claims

28 March 2014

Food for Thought



Since I have been traveling around Chile and Argentina, I have become more aware about the types of food, fruits and vegetables that are available here. Items that I assumed would be everywhere are harder to find here than I thought, if at all.

This has got me thinking about how much I take for granted back home in Australia. It has also got me thinking about the journey of the food that we find in our supermarkets and how we too, take their availability for granted. How long do you think you could survive if all your local supermarkets were closed indefinitely; or if all the trucks transporting the products and produce stopped running?
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